Former Avianca owner launches new carrier in Italy

Aeroitalia carried out its first charter flight this week with a Boeing 737-800 jet, but the goal is to operate transatlantic routes in 2023

After seeing the Brazilian airline OceanAir go bankrupt and being removed from the direction of Avianca Colombia, businessman German Efromovich reappeared in the media when he launched his new venture, Aeroitalia.

The new carrier is based in Italy and plans to launch regular European and transatlantic routes in November. For now, Aeroitalia has started charter flights like the one that took the basketball team Virtus Segafredo from Bologna to Valencia, Spain, on Tuesday.

The aircraft chosen by Efromovich’s company is the Boeing 737-800, from which it plans to have eight jets by the end of the year. For flights to America, Aeroitalia will have the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, explained the businessman born in Bolivia, but who has several other nationalities.

Efromovich’s initiative comes after unsuccessful attempts to acquire airlines Air Italy and Alitalia. In the new carrier, the president of Aeroitalia has partners such as French investor Marc Bourgarde, who owns the Argentine airline Avian. Additionally, Efromovich brought in former Alitalia CEO Giuseppe Caridu to be the COO of the new company.

The businessman Germán Efromovich (Cruks/Wikimedia)

Damage trail

German Efromovich and his brother José Efromovich became known in Latin America for launching the OceanAir airline in Brazil. Later they acquired control of Avianca, in Colombia, one of the oldest carriers in the world.

Both companies were part of the Synergy Group but were never directly linked, although OceanAir used the “Avianca” brand before going bankrupt in 2019.

The brothers also ended up away from Avianca after failing to repay a loan from United Airlines in the same year.

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